Criminal Activity and Immigration

A criminal conviction, whether a simple misdemeanor or major felony, can cause serious immigration consequences to anyone who is not a United States citizen. If you are an immigrant with a green card and have committed a criminal violation, there is a danger that your permanent residency can be taken away. Being convicted of a crime might also disqualify you from naturalization or obtaining U.S. citizenship. If you are applying for a green card and have committed a crime, you could be denied your permanent residency and placed into removal proceedings. If you have been convicted of a crime and you leave the U.S. even temporarily, when you try to return to the U.S. you could be barred from reentry or allowed to enter but placed in removal or deportation proceedings.

As soon as you are charged with a crime–even if it may not seem serious—immediately speak to an immigration attorney who understands the immigration effects of a criminal conviction.
If you have been arrested, charged or convicted of a crime, call or contact Sokhn Law as soon as possible to schedule an appointment to discuss the immigration consequences. Initial consultations are provided at a rate discounted from our standard fee.

Sokhn Law can provide immigration defense if you have a criminal record, and can advise you if your record poses a problem.  There are remedies available to protect your status, including:

  • Expungement: For certain drug crimes, you may apply to have your conviction expunged from your record so it is no longer held against you.
  • Post-conviction relief: A guilty or no contest (nolo contendere) plea may in certain cases be vacated as invalid if you were not advised by the court of the possibility of deportation, inadmissibility, or disqualification from citizenship and naturalization; or, if your criminal defense attorney failed to adequately warn you of the immigration consequences.
  • Waiver of inadmissibility: When you receive a waiver of inadmissibility (e.g., 212(h) or 212(c)), DHS forgives that particular crime in determining whether you should be removed or be granted admission to the United States.

As soon as you are charged with a crime—even if it may not seem serious—immediately speak to an immigration attorney who understands the immigration effects of a criminal conviction.

If you have been arrested, charged or convicted of a crime, call Sokhn Law to schedule an appointment to discuss the immigration consequences. You can choose to visit either our San Jose or San Francisco office. Initial consultations are provided at a rate discounted from our standard fee.
 

Disclaimer: The Law Office of Dina M. Sokhn has prepared this website and the contents contained therein solely for informational purposes. The contents of this website are not to be considered legal advice. Neither this website, nor access to or receipt of the information therefrom, is intended to create or constitute a lawyer/client relationship. This website is not intended as a substitute for legal counsel, and no one should act upon any information contained in this website without seeking legal counsel.